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NAMI Delaware is pleased to announce we will be hosting two community Mental Health First Aid classes in January 2020!

Friday, January 17th
Youth Mental Health First Aid Class
NAMI Delaware Office

REGISTER HERE >

Jan 17 2029 ymhfa flyer

January 23rd and January 24th
Two Half-day Sessions
Mental Health First Aid Class
NAMI Delaware Office

REGISTER HERE >

Jan 23-24 2020 MHFA flyer

Both classes are free to community members.

Questions, call:
Jenn Ford
Multi-Cultural Engagement Manager
NAMI Delaware
Phone 302-427-0787 ext 116
jford@namide.org

Vietnam Veterans of America

If you are a Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans or a surviving spouse, you are entitled to VA benefit starting 1 January 2020, in accordance with P.L. 116-23. Please read the FAQs below provided by the National Veterans Legal Service Program (NVLSP).

For legal assistance, CLICK HERE> and search for Accredited Attorneys, Claims Agents, or Veterans Service Organizations (VSO) Representatives.

A major change in law occurred in 2019 that should enable thousands of veterans who served on ships in the waters offshore Vietnam to obtain VA disability benefits for diseases associated with exposure to Agent Orange. The change in law should also enable survivors of these veterans to obtain VA death compensation for deaths due to diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): This document provides answers to the most frequently asked questions we are getting from Blue Water Vietnam Veterans (as those who served in the waters offshore Vietnam are commonly called) and their survivors about the recent change in law.

1) What is this change in law and how did it come about?

Earlier this year in a case called Procopio v. Wilkie, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit concluded that the Agent Orange Act of 1991 requires VA to presume that those who served in the territorial waters offshore Vietnam were exposed to Agent Orange. The Court ruled that this presumption applies to all veterans who served within 12 nautical miles of Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

Congress then enacted the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 Public Law 116-23 and incorporated the Procopio decision. The Act states that a veteran who, during active military, naval, or air service, served offshore of the Republic of Vietnam during the period of beginning on January 9, 1962, and ending on May 7, 1975, shall be presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange. The term offshore is defined as no more than 12 nautical miles seaward of a line commencing on the southwestern demarcation line of the waters of Vietnam and Cambodia.

The full Procopio decision can be read here >

The entire Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 can be read here >

2) What does this change in law mean for Blue Water Vietnam Veterans?

It means that a veteran covered by Procopio and the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 should become entitled to service-connected disability benefits if the veteran (1) files a claim for disability benefits with the VA and (2) suffers from one of the diseases that VA recognizes as associated with Agent Orange exposure.

3) What does this change in law mean for survivors of deceased Blue Water Vietnam Veterans?

It means that a qualifying survivor, such as a surviving spouse, of a veteran who (1) is covered by Procopio and the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 and (2) died from a disease that VA recognizes as associated with Agent Orange exposure, should become entitled to service-connected death compensation (known as DIC) if the survivor files a DIC claim.

4) What diseases are now recognized by the VA as associated with Agent Orange?

A full list of diseases recognized by VA as associated with Agent Orange can be found here >

These diseases include:

  • Cancer of the larynx
  • Lung cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Cancer of the trachea
  • Hodgkin’s disease
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Hairy cell leukemia
  • Ischemic heart disease (including, but not limited to: acute, subacute and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease (including coronary spasm) and coronary bypass surgery; and stable, unstable, and Prinzmetal’s angina)
  • Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset diabetes, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and type II diabetes mellitus)
  • AL amyloidosis (also known as primary amyloidosis)
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Soft tissue sarcomas
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature B-cell type
  • B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia
  • Precursor B lymphoblastic leukemia
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
  • Follicular lymphoma
  • Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma (MALT)
  • Small cell lymphocytic lymphoma
  • Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL)
  • Burkitt lymphoma
  • Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma
  • Waldenström macroglobulinemia
  • Nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma
  • Splenic marginal zone lymphoma
  • Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma
  • Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma
  • Primary effusion lymphoma
  • Lymphomatoid granulomatosis
  • Early-onset peripheral neuropathy
  • Chloracne
  • Porphyria cutanea tarda

5) Do I need to file another claim if I already filed a VA claim for benefits for an Agent Orange-related disease and that claim is still pending at the VA?

No. If you are sure that your claim for an Agent Orange-related disease is still pending, you do not need to file another claim. However, you may wish to file a statement with VA in support of your pending claim stating that you are entitled to benefits under Procopio and the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019.

6) Do I need to file another claim if my previous claim for an Agent Orange-related disease was finally denied by the VA and is no longer pending?

Yes. You need to file another claim.

7) How do I file a VA claim for service-connected disability benefits?

If you have not previously filed a disability claim for a disease VA now recognizes as associated with Agent Orange, you should file a claim for these benefits using VA Form 21-526EZ (AVAILABLE HERE >).

If you previously filed a disability claim for a disease VA now recognizes as associated with Agent Orange and the VA finally denied that claim, you should file a supplemental claim for disability compensation for that disease using VA Form 20-0995 (AVAILABLE HERE >). On that form, you should check the box for “compensation” in block 12, and write the following language in box 13A: “I am entitled to disability benefits for [put in name of your Agent Orange related disease] under the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 and Procopio.” In block 13B of that form, you should write the date of the VA decision that denied you benefits for that disease. If you don’t know the date, we suggest that you write the following language in block 13B: “See my claims file for date of denial of my claim for [put in name of your Agent Orange related disease].”

In order to help ensure you are awarded the earliest possible effective date for benefits, you should not delay in filing a VA claim.

8) How do I file a DIC claim?

If you have not previously filed a claim for DIC, you should file an initial claim for DIC using a VA Form 21P-534EZ (AVAILABLE HERE >).

If you previously filed a claim for DIC and the VA finally denied that claim, you should file a supplemental claim for DIC using a VA Form 20-0995 (AVAILABLE HERE >). On that form you should check the box for “pension/survivors benefits” in block 12, and write the following language in box 13A: “Because of the Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 and Procopio, I am entitled to DIC given that [put in name of the Agent Orange related disease that led to the veteran’s death] led to the veteran’s death.” In block 13B of that form, you should write the date of the VA decision that denied you DIC benefits. If you don’t know the date, we suggest that you write the following language in block 13B: “See my claims file for date VA denied DIC.”

In order to help ensure you are awarded the earliest possible effective date for benefits, you should not delay in filing a VA claim.

9) If my claim is granted, how much will I be entitled to in retroactive benefits?

The effective date assigned by the VA to awards of disability and DIC benefits is usually the date the claim was received by the VA. For example, if VA grants benefits based on the veteran’s first claim for an Agent Orange-related disease and that claim was filed in January 2019, the veteran will be assigned an effective date in (and will be paid retroactive compensation to) January 2019.

However, if the VA grants benefits based on a veteran’s second or third claim for the same Agent Orange-related disease, the effective date of the award should be retroactive to the date the VA received the veteran’s first claim for that disease – as long that claim was received by VA after September 24, 1985.

This means, for example, that if a veteran filed a disability claim for type 2 diabetes that VA received in 2003 and the VA denied it, and the veteran now files a second disability claim for type 2 diabetes, the veterans should receive disability compensation retroactive to 2003 – as long as the veteran served within the 12 nautical mile limit and has suffered from diabetes since at least 2003.

10) Do I need to add evidence to my claim to prove that I served within 12 nautical miles of Vietnam?

Maybe yes. Maybe no. VA has a duty to veterans (and survivors) who apply for VA benefits to assist them in obtaining the evidence necessary to substantiate their claims. In many cases, it may be clear to the VA from the military service and VA documents already in your claims file that you served within 12 nautical miles of the shore. For example, if these records show you served on a ship when it was located in a harbor of Vietnam, then it will be obvious to the VA that you served within the 12 nautical mile limit.

In other cases, it may not be obvious from a review of the documents in your VA claims file. In these cases, you should inform the VA of the name of the ship on which you served and the dates you were on the ship, and ask the VA to obtain a copy of the deck logs of the ship. You should also ask the VA to send you a copy of the deck logs that they obtain.

11) What if the VA is unable to obtain the deck logs of my ship?

In the unlikely event that the VA is unable to obtain the deck logs of your ship, you should submit a statement to the VA with your claim explaining why you believe your ship was within 12 nautical miles of the shore (for example, “during our deployment in 1967, we could see the landmass of Vietnam. My division officer informed me that the land we saw was Vietnam;” or, “I was a quartermaster and know from our plotted position on navigation charts that the ship was within 12 nautical miles of the coast of Vietnam.”). You should also try to obtain written statements from fellow crewmembers who were aware that the ship was within 12 nautical miles of the coast and submit them to the VA.

12) How long will it take for VA to decide my claim for a disease recognized by VA as associated with Agent Orange?

In June 2019, VA Secretary Wilkie ordered the VA regional offices and the Board of Veterans’ Appeals to hold off making any decisions on claims that are based on service in the offshore waters of Vietnam and a disease that VA recognizes as associated with Agent Orange exposure. This includes disability compensation and DIC claims. This moratorium on deciding claims will remain in effect until January 1, 2020. Therefore, do not expect a decision on your claim until next year.

13) Will NVLSP be able to represent veterans and their surviving family members before the VA on their Agent Orange claims?

We regret that the answer is no. We advise you to obtain a representative from a veterans service organization located in your state. You can find a veterans service organization that will assist you for free at https://www.benefits.va.gov/vso/varo.asp
For more information on the legal services NVLSP provides please go to:
https://www.nvlsp.org/what-we-do/lawyers-serving-warriors/
https://www.nvlsp.org/what-we-do/class-actions/

Source: https://www.nvlsp.org/news-and-events/news-articles/nvlsps-faqs-for-blue-water-vietnam-veterans

Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) is the only national Vietnam veterans organization congressionally chartered and exclusively dedicated to Vietnam-era veterans and their families

CLICK HERE to sign the petition >

Suiting Warriors to Provide Professional Attire to all United States Military Veterans and their Spouses through Annual SuitUP^

SuitUP^ to Coincide with Army-Navy Game Week in Philadelphia

Suiting Warriors, a mobile suiting service that provides upscale professional attire, wardrobe consulting, and education to transitioning service members, veterans, and their spouses who are on their way to a new career, is bringing its annual SuitUP^ event to the URBN Sourcing Department in the Naval Yard on Wednesday, December 11th, 2019 from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, by appointment.

On Thursday, December 12th, Suiting Warriors will host its Annual Suiting Warriors Charity Dinner from 6:00PM to 8:00 PM at the Freedom’s Foundation in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

At the Army-Navy Game on Saturday December 14th, Suiting Warriors will be hosting a Tailgate Party at Lincoln Financial Stadium, Parking Lot M-N. Fans and patrons can stop by, visit, learn more about Suiting Warriors, and donate to help support the cause, while celebrating our veterans at this time honored annual tradition.

Tickets for all events are available by visiting the Suiting Warriors Eventbrite Page

The Suiting Warriors SuitUP^ Program travels up and down the East Coast with their stylists and works with those who are preparing for job fairs, interviews, networking events and looking for daily career wear and formal attire. Suiting Warriors has served over 5,000 veterans and their spouses since 2012.

Registration for SuitUP^ is required. Appointments will be estimated one hour and will include an individual wardrobe consulting discussion about your professional clothing needs, measurements you can take home and time to try on several pieces. Be prepared to show your DD214 and/or Veteran I.D. or Military Spouse approved information.

Men will receive at least: 2 suits, 1 sports coat, 2 ties, dress socks, and if available additional dress pants, an overcoat, or tuxedo. Women will receive 1 suit, 1 blazer, 1 blouse, skirt, pants, and if available accessories to match. All items are first come, first serve.

About Suiting Warriors:

Suiting Warriors provides wardrobe consulting, education and transitioning services to veterans and their spouses on the path to a new career. The SuitUP^ Program provides business suits and professional business attire to transitioning veterans from active duty. Suiting Warriors also prepares returning veterans for graduation, assists in support for job fairs, interviews, networking events, daily career wear and formal attire. During SuitUP^ events, Suiting Warriors volunteer stylists provide professional attire and assistance for each veteran’s individual fit and style preference. Suiting Warriors also partners with various employment, career, and educational organizations to connect services with the transitioning veteran population. Partners include VSOs, ESGR, National Guard, Colleges, and Universities, private technology schools.

Learn more about Suiting Warriors >

Respite Grant Funding is Now Available for Delaware Residents! Take a Break Through Easterseals Respite Grants

While caregiving is rewarding, it requires an immense amount of time and energy and often leads to caregiver burnout. Respite helps to keep family caregivers physically and emotionally healthy by reducing the likelihood of depression, anxiety, and isolation.

Through Easterseals respite services, caregivers can receive a voucher to be used to pay for the care of your loved one while you take a break. Whether that is going to dinner, seeing a movie, or reading a book – whatever gives you a break! The eligibility requirements for each grant are listed on the attached flyer.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY > 
or call 302-221-2087

Anya Taylor
Community Outreach Assistant
Easterseals Delaware & Maryland’s Eastern Shore
61 Corporate Circle
New Castle, DE 19720
O: 302-221-2087

Easterseals Respite Grants Flyer

Prevention Coordinator

(contractor position assigned to DEARNG, temporary backfill estimated until 30 Sep 2020)

The Prevention Coordinator will serve as the Substance Abuse Prevention Trainer and Case Manager within their assigned State Army National Guard. The PC will report directly to the ADCO.  The PC will Coordinate and conduct Substance Abuse Prevention (SAP) Training for ARNG Units that meet or supersede the requirements in AR 600-85 and AR 350-53. The PC will coordinate, facilitate, quality check and ship the Unit Risk Inventory (URI) and Reintegration Unit Risk Inventory (RURI).  Please see attached for full job duties.

Education and Experience: Associates Degree in a Social Science or related field, or 3 – 5 years of practical experience in the Substance Abuse Prevention, Suicide Prevention or Resiliency field.

Required Qualifications: Strong and professional instruction and briefing skills which demonstrate flexibility with various audiences. Ability to work a variable schedule as duties require, including some of the weekends that state units are conducting training.

Interested candidates are requested to email their resumes to:
carsonc@dystech.com

QUESTIONS/CONTACT:
Carson Casto
Dynamic Systems Technology | Contractor
NE Regional Manager
C:  (803) 513-1093
carsonc@dystech.com

Prevention Coordinator Position Description DE

By William L. Witham Jr.

Starting on Nov. 1, the Delaware Supreme Court will permit military spouses who are attorneys in good standing in other states to apply for a Certificate of Limited Practice in Delaware without having to pass the Delaware Bar exam.

In doing so, Delaware joins other states that have created similar programs for military spouses. This is an important change and one that is uniquely tailored to address the special circumstances faced by military families who often find themselves required to move from place to place, and from state to state, on short notice in support of the nation’s defense.

Our military readiness is degraded when spouses engaged in the practice of law are unable to practice their profession when their military spouse transfers to a different jurisdiction. Often, transfers compel spouses to “stay behind” so they can continue to practice law.

That, in turn, forces families to separate, which puts our military families in an untenable position. That practice cannot and, as we have recently noted, should not stand.

Now that this change has been made, it may seem like it was a simple and easy thing to do.

It was not. This change has only come after a long and deliberative process that required a great deal of effort by a large number of people. The Supreme Court and countless others have recognized that waiving passage of the Delaware Bar Examination is not something to be done lightly.

But after due consideration, it is something we decided needed to be done. Out of deference to our public, out of deference to our Bar, and out of deference to those who serve our nation’s defense, we proudly announce this rule.

This effort began in September 2012, when, in part because of my military background, then- Chief Justice Myron T. Steele asked me to assist the Military Spouse JD Network (MSJDN) with the adoption of a special rule to permit military spouses to engage in the limited practice of law in Delaware.

Chief Justice Steele, at the time, was the chair of a national organization – the Conference of Chief Justices – that supported this effort. In addition, the American Bar Association (ABA) passed a resolution urging states to adopt military spouse rules, regulations and procedures to accommodate their unique needs. Since that time, the nation has seen 37 jurisdictions adopt similar rules, and I am proud Delaware has now joined those ranks.

On average, military families move every two or three years. Service members have limited capacity to choose their next duty station and are often notified of transfers on short notice.

This process limits a military spouse’s ability to register and prepare for a new state’s bar examination.

In addition, military spouse attorneys face unique challenges to their legal careers. According to a 2016 MSJDN survey, 87% report that their spouse’s service has affected their legal careers. Military affiliation is frequently a reason employers choose not to hire military spouse attorneys. Military spouse attorneys may also have gaps in their resumes and may not be able to shoulder the time and resources necessary to take an additional bar exam.

In 2018, our effort was augmented by Superior Court President Judge Jan R. Jurden, herself a veteran, as we continued to press for consideration of the rule. Our combined efforts led to a consensus and on Sept. 23, 2019, the Supreme Court adopted Rule 55.4 – Limited Permission to Practice as a Military Spouse.

This rule, which goes into effect next month, will help military families when they face transition and will also preserve the high caliber of attorneys we have allowed to practice law in this state.

This journey has been long. But it was been well worth the considerable effort. I am sure that military families appreciate this initiative as it reinforces the commitment that we, the Delaware Judiciary, have for those who serve us on a daily basis.

William L. Witham Jr. is a Delaware Superior Court resident judge and a retired colonel in the Delaware Army National Guard.

Be part of the Annual Veteran Trust Fund Dinner gala on November 9 at Dover Downs Rollins Center.

There are a great many worthy causes that ask for our help, especially as the holiday season draws near. One of them is the Delaware Veterans Trust Fund, administered by the Commission of Veterans Affairs.

Since 2013 the Trust Fund has provided one-time, hand-up grants to veterans in proven need. Last year $104,000 was paid directly to creditors to stop utility cutoffs, repossessions, make emergency repairs on homes and vehicles, and sometimes put food on the table.

The Friends of Delaware Veterans, a volunteer board of military veterans, is hosting its 6th annual fundraising dinner Saturday, November 9, at Dover Downs’ Rollins Center. All of the proceeds will benefit the Trust Fund. Maj. Gen. Michael Berry will keynote this year’s dinner. The registration deadline is Oct. 30.

Tickets are $100 and include musical entertainment, a plated meal, and silent and live auctions of valuable items, including MV 1 and 2 (Military Veteran) license plates. Contact Sherri Taylor at sherri.taylor@delaware.gov or call 302-257-3117 to reserve a seat. No tickets will be sold at the door.

Visit DelawareVeteransTrustFund.com for more information or to make a tax deductible contribution.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Dave Skocik, president
Friends of Delaware Veterans
dskocik@aol.com

2020 Brain Injury Conference has been scheduled for March 5, 2020 at Dover Downs’ Conference Center in Dover, Delaware. We are currently seeking sponsors, exhibitors, and attendees for this event. Attached you will find the sponsorship/exhibitor information and form.

QUESTIONS, CONTACT:
Kristy Handley, M.S.
Executive Director
Brain Injury Association of Delaware
P.O. Box 1897, Dover, DE 19903

302-346-2083 | 1-800-411-0505
director@biade.org

2020 Conference Sponsorship Forms
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Donate To The Delaware Veterans Trust Fund Online
Apply for VA Benefits Online
Delaware Joining Forces